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Learn how to...

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Make Your Own!

Meteorologists study the weather by recording and analyzing data. You can become an amateur meteorologist by building your own weather station and keeping a record of your measurements. After a while, you'll notice the weather patterns that allow meteorologists to forecast the weather.

Since weather happens outside, you'll need to construct your weather station inside of a weatherproof box. Find a sturdy plastic or wooden box that can be placed on its side. Before you take the box outside, attach a thermometer to the bottom of the box. Once you turn the box on its side, the thermometer will be in the back of the box, protected from direct weather conditions.

Take your box outside and find a safe, sturdy location on the north side of the building where it's shadiest. Position the box securely beside the building, perhaps on a brick foundation.

Keep Your Own Weather Journal
Every meteorologist needs to keep a good weather journal. Remember, good observations make good forecasts.

Make Your Own Barometer
Since barometers are very sensitive to minor changes in weather conditions, you'll want to keep the barometer indoors to get more accurate readings.

Make Your Own Hygrometer
Place your hygrometer outdoors, inside your weatherproof weather station box. The hygrometer will measure the amount of moisture in the air, or humidity.

Make Your Own Rain Gauge
Your rain gauge needs to be kept outdoors, but not inside the weatherproof box. If it's possible, though, you may want to keep them near each other to make it easier to record your data.

Make Your Own Weather Vane
A weather vane is also know as a wind direction indicator. The vane points in the direction from which the wind blows.

Make Your Own Anemometer
An anemometer helps you determine wind speed. Use it with your weather vane to measure the wind.

Make Your Own Compass
To record your weather data, you'll need a compass. You can make your own using only a stick, a few stones, and the sun.

 
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