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R a i n   G a u g e

 
First, build the rack.Then, build the rain collector cup.

You'll need these materials:
a glass beaker (or any straight-sided glass that can be marked with a measuring scale)
a coat hanger or wire (bent to make a holding rack -- see picture)
hammer and nails (to secure the rack)

Basically, any measuring glass left outside can serve as a rain gauge. However, since most rain showers are usually quite windy, you'll want to fasten your rain gauge somewhere so that it doesn't blow over. Locate a good place for your gauge. There should be nothing overhead, like trees, electric wires, or the edge of a roof. These obstructions can direct rainwater into or away from your gauge, creating a false reading. The edge of a fence, away from the building, is often a good place for your gauge.

Once you have found the spot, attach the holding rack (refer to picture). Then, slip your measuring glass into position. Wait for rain, then record your measurement, and empty the glass.

 
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