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S n o w   S h o w s

 
Snow what?

Snow is a particularly pretty form of precipitation. Snow crystals, basically frozen water molecules, are six-sided ice crystals that form when the air temperature is below the freezing point for water: 32 degrees Fahrenheit, or zero degrees Celsius. A snowflake is a bundle of several snow crystals. A snowstorm can also include periods of sleet or freezing rain if the air temperature varies. Snowstorm intensity can range from flurries to blizzards.

As with rain showers, snow showers can be tracked and forecasted using RADAR images, although snowflakes don't reflect RADAR waves quite as well as raindrops. Reflectivity images show the location of a snowstorm and its intensity.

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