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Here comes a cold front

A cold front occurs where a large mass of cold air meets a mass of warmer air, and the cold air advances on the warmer air. Remember that warm air rises. So, when the two air masses meet, the heavier cold air pushes up the lighter warm air. The disruption in the atmosphere causes clouds, rain, gusty winds, and, sometimes, thunderstorms followed by cooler temperatures.

If a cold front approaches on a hot day, it can cause an abrupt change in the weather like a thunderstorm. Later, however, after the cold front passes, the cooler air is a welcome relief.

As with any storm, satellite and RADAR images provide tracking information for meteorologists to locate and measure cold front activity.

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Cold Front (611k)

 
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