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History of Computing
Most students today have had their fingers on a keyboard since pre-school. Many are surprised to discover that computers haven't been around forever. Take a look at this site to discover the history behind the computer. The text is well-written and easy to understand, making it useful for most classrooms.

CReAte Your Own Newspaper
CRAYON is an innovative Web page that allows you to create your own online newspaper, save it on your hard drive, and read it every day. We were skeptical at first, but, by following the directions carefully, we customized our own unique newspage that points to places that change daily. Identify what kind of news your class needs, and create your own classroom newspage. Check it every morning. It's very cool.

Mythology and Legends
If your curriculum includes a discussion of myths and legends, you will love this site! Take a look at a few of the legends and then try making up some of your own. How would ancient people have used myth to explain modern technology? Try writing a legend for the origin of computers, television, or even automobiles.

Whale Web Project
If your curriculum includes a study of whales, consider this teacher-designed website that offers everything you could possibly need to learn about whales.

Ice Art `95
University Park Elementary School in Fairbanks, Alaska offers a peek at the unique artistic efforts displayed at their local ice sculpting festival, held during March. The competing sculptors included local artisans as well as a variety of international entrants. Say farewell to winter with one last look at its beauty.

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