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inQuiry Almanack

[ Spotlighting | Minutes from ME | Wired@School | inQuiry Attic | Great Dates ]

February, 1999
volume five, issue two

Robotics is a hot new topic at The Franklin Institute! To complement the opening of our RoboMania exhibit, this month's "Spotlight" is a "Robo-Spot." Learn about individual robots, various projects that are under way, and other elements that contribute to the ever-growing field of robotics.

The door to the "inQuiry Attic" swings open for a look at the famous Nini medallion created in the likeness of Benjamin Franklin. We honor Franklin in this special 175th anniversary year, but find out how he was "i-doll-ized" in his own time!

Margaret Ennis continues "A Pre-Reader's PC Primer" in the latest issue of "Minutes from ME." Explore the wonderful capabilities of copying and pasting!

The "Wired @ School" teachers present brand new features for fun and learning.

Gail Watson's resource on "Native Americans" shows what some students have learned about the native peoples of North America.

Paul Myers offers the featured earth science resource entitled "El Niño and La Niña: What's the Difference?"

Carla Schutte helps make us "Wildlife Ambassadors" with her feature on the Florida scrub jay and manatees. Learn about these animals and what you can do to protect them.

February is a great month for "Great Dates." Learn all about Groundhog's Day, Valentine's Day, Mardi Gras, and Black History Month, to name a few.


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