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Wired@School

The Online Fellows
Paulette Dukerich, Tammy Payton, Karen Walkowiak, Hazel Jobe, Gail Watson, Robert Owens, Paul Myers, Michael Lipinski, and Carla Schutte (pictured left to right)

Across North America, wires are being pulled through hallways and classrooms. Massive movements are underway to make "wired" schools.

Meanwhile, teachers face more challenges than ever before. Tight budgets, school violence, and calls for reform combine to create "wired" teachers who balance the stress with their love of teaching.

What does it mean to be "Wired@School?" Why pull wires in schools where there are bigger problems? What can a network do to help?

For the past few years, The Franklin Institute's webteam has explored the use of networked technology as a tool for teaching and learning. The Internet has tremendous potential for supporting teachers in their professional practice.

Just watch. Throughout the 1998-1999 school year, "Wired@School" will feature the work of nine teachers who are pioneering the use of the Internet in K-8 schools. Known as "Online Fellows," these educators were invited to participate based on the nature of the online work they were already doing. Beginning in October, three fellows will publish each month. The variety of ideas should convince you that being "Wired@School" can work for anyone.

In August, the group gathered at The Franklin Institute and explored some of the exhibit halls. Each month, "Wired@School" will feature at least one publication on the theme of earth science. The nine different approaches to the topic will surely demonstrate the power of the web to reach all audiences.

The Franklin Institute Online proudly introduces the 1998-99 Fellows...

Tammy Payton Tammy Payton
Loogootee Elementary School West
Loogootee, Indiana
www.siec.k12.in.us/~west/

Paulette Dukerich
Bethune Academy
Houston, Texas
www.serve.com/bethune/

Michael Lipinski
Erving Elementary School
Erving, Massachusetts
www.erving.com

Gail Watson
John F. Pattie Elementary School
Dumfries, Virginia
www.illuminet.net/pattie/

Paul Myers
Cucamonga Middle School
Rancho Cucamonga, California
www.csd.k12.ca.us/cucamonga/

Carla Schutte
Moton Elementary School
Brooksville, Florida
hernando.com/moton/

The Group
Paulette and Paul Robert Owens
Durand School
Vineland, New Jersey
www.cyberenet.net/~durand/

Hazel Jobe
Marshall Elementary School
Lewisburg, Tennessee
www.marshall-es.marshall.k12.tn.us

Karen Walkowiak
Holy Redeemer Catholic School
Kanata, Ontario, Canada
www.occdsb.on.ca/~red/


The Franklin Institute Fellowship program is an initiative of the Educational Technology Programs Department of The Franklin Institute Science Museum, in affiliation with the Science Learning Network. The Fellowship program and the Science Learning Network are made possible through generous support from Unisys, our corporate partner.

SLN Unisys


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