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inQuiry Almanack

[ Spotlighting | Minutes from ME | Wired@School | inQuiry Attic | Great Dates ]

November, 1998
volume four, issue nine

Look around. Surely there must be a few scraps of paper nearby that you can use to build an airplane. For a few months in 1901, Wilbur and Orville Wright used every scrap of paper they could find, even the ones on the wall, to build an airplane. Sound crazy? Explore the "inQuiry Attic" and see how.

Nobody would try to build a museum of paper. There are better materials, like marble and stone, for supporting several stories of science. The November Spotlight falls on Structures at The Franklin Institute Science Museum. Explore the architecture and physical principles that keep science standing.

Speaking of stone, the featured earth science resource for November is "A Journey II the Center of the Earth," created by Gail Watson, a "Wired@School" teacher, and her students.

Meanwhile, Paul Myers, another "Wired@School" teacher, presents "Operation Webfoot" in which a couple of stuffed friends travel around the world on a scientific mission of lifesaving proportions.

Carla Schutte offers an alternative method for spanning the globe. Her "Wired@School" presentation relates her experiences with videoconferencing in educational settings.

ME's minutes continue to explore the use of computers with pre-readers. Post-readers will enjoy the activities as well.

Finally, "Great Dates" offers resources for celebrating that most American of holidays...Thanksgiving!


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