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Caught in The Web

Hunters Woods Elementary School

Caught in the web this month, Hunters Woods Elementary School in Reston, Virginia is among the growing community of schools that have a high bandwidth (T-1) connection to the Internet. Their high-tech access helps them achieve their mission: "The mission of Hunters Woods Arts and Science Magnet School is to provide a program that weaves the arts, sciences, and technologies into the curriculum to extend and stimulate the educational potential of all children."

Online at Hunters Woods, Life in the Science Discovery Room is always busy. You can meet Harryetta the Tarantula, check the results of The Great Paper Towel Contest, or read about Physics and Poetry.

Are kids at Hunters Woods having any fun on the web? Sneak a peek at Kids Corner and you'll get the idea.

Always looking to try something new, this year's 5th and 6th grades are building a "Museum in Progress Exhibit" on Native Americans and Explorers. So far, there's only a "teaser," but the project results promise to be most interesting.

Last November, the National Air and Space Museum hosted Hunters Woods Science Night. Students gave their imaginations a workout as they tried to answer the question, "How big is big?"

Hunters Woods seems like a school that is poised on the brink of really taking off on the web. You'll want to keep your eye on their website. Check in frequently.


Who will be "Caught in The Web" next month? Feel free to send us suggestions.


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