Pieces of Science

The Story

For Teachers

For Students

For Reference

Principles of Photography

Ten Tips for Better Pictures

Simplicity - The simpler, the better

Distractions - Avoid them!

Cropping - Do this with the camera first. Capture the most important part of the picture - the part that makes the story. Your pictures need to have a variety of types of croppings.

Perspective - Try to get interesting perspective that other photographers have not tried, or that you have not often seen. Bend your knees, and tippy-toe whenever necessary. Standing on a bench, chair, ladder, etc. can be an excellent helper.

Lighting - Use natural lighting whenever you can. You want to create a mood with your lighting. Watch where you have shadows. Any indoor picture may need a flash.

Action - Place yourself close to the action. Try to get people in action. Capture their daily activities. Sprts scenes lend themselves to fast action. When photographing sports, try to get as many faces as you can.

Contrast - Try to get your blacks as black as possible and your whites as white as possible. Contrast small shapes with large shapes.

Creativity - Create a new view of a common picture. See things in a way that you never noticed before. Crop your center of interest so that it is telling the whole story - showing faces, expressions, moods, movements, stances, situations, and experiences that we all share at one time or another. Find our likenesses and differences.

Consistency - Be as consistent as you can. At first this will be difficult, but it will slowly start to make an impression on you when you do certain things the same that give you good pictures. Follow that, so your pictures are the best possible.

Balance - Each picture has its own balance and should be pleasing to look at. It can be formally balalnced or informally balanced, but the basic principles of design apply here too. Try not to make something look like it is falling off the page, etc.