The Franklin Institute's Resources for Science Learning x
Home (Main Navigation - Resources for Science Learning @ The Franklin Institute)For Learners (Main Navigation - Resources for Science Learning @ The Franklin Institute)For Educators (Main Navigation - Resources for Science Learning @ The Franklin Institute)Leadership (Main Navigation - Resources for Science Learning @ The Franklin Institute)Partnership (Main Navigation - Resources for Science Learning @ The Franklin Institute)About Us (Main Navigation - Resources for Science Learning @ The Franklin Institute)

 
 

Introducing the Brain Food Pyramid

Nourish your Brain—Enrich Your Life

We are the adapted offspring of Earth—creatures of habitat—interactive beings animated by the amazing metabolic dance of life. Nutrients from the earth nourish our innate propensity toward wellness. Balances may shift, but harmony and health are the hallmarks of our existence. When all the elements are present you can experience the vigor, vitality, and creativity that is your birthright. How well you nourish your brain determines how well your brain will nurture you—for the performance of a lifetime.

You can watch the brain food pyramid animation or use the controls at the bottom to advance or pause at your own pace. Click the arrow to learn more about the four nutritional aspects of each side.

The conventional Food Guide Pyramid seen on cereal boxes is actually a triangle. The Brain-Food Pyramid, however, is modeled after a true pyramid—a three-dimensional structure with four sides—like the ancient ones in Egypt and Central America, as well as the modern ones in Las Vegas, Memphis, and Paris.

The Brain-Food Pyramid serves as an image to help visualize and understand how the food you eat affects the health of your brain and the quality of your life.

The four sides of the pyramid each represent a unique nutritional aspect of food and its primary metabolic role in brain structure and function. All sides work together to complete a strong and durable pyramid—a healthy and enduring brain.

Essentially, fats build your brain, and proteins unite it. Carbohydrates fuel your brain, and micronutrients defend it.

Note: As a model, the Brain-Food Pyramid cannot be a completely accurate representation of brain nutrition. The actions of foods overlap, and the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. Food labels tell you how much fat, protein, and carbohydrates are contained in a serving, as well as some key micronutrients.

 

webteam@www.fi.edu
© 2004 - The Franklin Institute Online - All rights reserved.