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EARTHFORCE
 

If you have ever felt the rumble of an earthquake or seen the eruption of a volcano, you've witnessed EARTHFORCE. For scientists, the word force is defined as a push or pull that causes a change in motion. EARTHFORCE, then, is the pushing and pulling in the core, crust, or water of the Earth that causes motion like eruptions, quakes, or floods.

EARTHFORCE in the core

Beneath the surface of the Earth, tremendous EARTHFORCES are at work, pushing and pulling against the crust.

EARTHFORCE in the crust

The surface of the Earth, called the crust, is constantly moving, creating its own EARTHFORCE.

EARTHFORCE in the water

About three-quarters of the Earth's crust is covered with water where EARTHFORCES are always at work.

EARTHFORCES are constantly at work. Every day, somewhere, the core, crust, or water is pushing and pulling and causing motion. Keep track of the daily changes EARTHFORCE causes.

Global Earthquake Report
Earth Now
Geoscience News
Savage Earth

An EARTHFORCE event is not always a disaster, but, sometimes, they strike in populated areas. When that happens, people need help.

FEMA: Preparing for a Disaster
Disaster Relief Agencies

 
EARTHFORCE Idea Index:

[ Volcanoes | Earthquakes | Floods | Tsunami | Avalanches ]

 

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