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The City

Worldwide Water Ways

Cities around the world

Each city's water supply is dependent upon the city's location. Some communities around the world have figured out some fascinating solutions to their water problems.

Cities in deserts, for example, have particularly interesting water needs. The city of Los Angeles would not exist without the creative water supply system conceptualized by William Mulholland.

Cities in cold climates have unique challenges, too. In Winnipeg, Canada, the aqueduct which would transport water from nearby freshwater lakes needed to be insulated to prevent the water from freezing.

Weather can also impact a city's water supply. In Bombay, India, for example, the annual monsoon season provides a substantial reservoir of freshwater that is used throughout the year.

The survival of a city's water supply, and of the city itself, also depends upon having city planners who are constantly seeking ways to modernize the system. The Massachusetts Water Resources Authority, for example, has changed the sources and processes for supplying water to its communities, keeping current with new technologies.

New York City also has needed to keep pace with the times. How does a large, aging, densely-populated city develop new systems for water supply? The construction of the Third Water Supply Tunnel, an engineering masterpiece, is one answer.

Fortunately, New York City's watershed supports the large population. By studying the maps, you can see that there are many sources of water.

Across the United States, cities and communities face their own unique situations for water supply. For more information about them, try browsing these resources.

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