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The City

Water in The City

A beautiful picture of the fountain at Logan Circle Another beautiful picture of the fountain at Logan Circle

In one kitchen, in one apartment, in one building, on one block, in one neighborhood, of one city, a young man goes to the faucet and fills a kettle with water. At the very same instant, thousands of other people in that same city may also be tapping into the water supply. How is it possible?
Start brainstorming. Where can you find water in the city? Fountains? Rivers? Kitchen sinks? Puddles? Lakes? Swimming pools? Reservoirs? Sewers? Creeks? Rain?
Now, think about this: how are all of the sources of water related? Throughout history, cities have survived or failed because of water. The water supply in a city is the vital lifeblood that keeps a city going. While the water supply is healthy, citizens take it for granted. If the supply is severely interrupted, the city will surely die.
Water Basics

What is water? Why do we need it? Most citizens learn at a very early age the importance of water. Basic water information offers a foundation for learning to respect and conserve this precious natural resource.

Water Science

Where is water produced? How pure is water? Anyone who has ever taken a drink of tap water needs to understand the science of water. Consider the chemistry of water before you pour your next glass.

Philadelphia Water Ways

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, home of The Franklin Institute, volunteered to have its water supply system analyzed. If you are not in Philadelphia, consider how your own city compares.

Worldwide Water Ways

Throughout the United States, and around the world, each city's water supply depends upon its geography, climate, and weather. Consider some case studies. Then, investigate your own water system.

Reference and Activities

For more background information, use the reference resources. Also, try some of the water activities. They're not all wet.

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