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Here we are! The community that I work for wants me to help them deal with erosion on this beach. I'm going to try to predict how the erosion will happen so that the community can have a better idea what this beach will look like in a few years. It'll help them know how to plan.

My work involves a bit of sleuthing. In order to predict what might happen in the future, I need to know what happened in the past. To do this, I look at old photographs taken from the air and old navigational charts, and I study the reports of scientists who came before me. I also need to investigate the patterns of the sediments. To do this, I need to take core samples.

I use a special tool that helps me dig down deep into the ground—sometimes as deep as thirty feet. It's like a long hollow tube, and it takes a sample of all of the sand and soil, in exactly the same placement as it is in the ground. I learn a lot about what the coastline is composed of by doing this. And I take core samples all over the coastal zone—way up in the marshes in swamps, and all over the beach. I label each sample so I know precisely where I got it from, and then I examine them back in my lab.

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